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Safe Orthopaedics Offers New Technologies to Treat Traumatic Injuries Due to Osteoporosis or Bone Metastases

Mittwoch, 15.02.2017 17:50



ERAGNY-SUR-OISE, France --(BUSINESS WIRE)--

Regulatory News:

SAFE ORTHOPAEDICS (Paris:SAFOR) (FR0012452746 – SAFOR), a company offering innovative ranges of sterile implants combined with their single-use instruments for back surgery, now offers a transverse connector designed to rigidify the stabilisation of posterior spinal osteosynthesis, as well as cement injectable through the Cypress screw to enhance its anchoring strength in osteoporotic or metastatic bone.

Osteoporosis and bone metastatic disease are associated with reduced bone density, which makes the bone more brittle. Osteoporosis is a widespread condition, affecting mostly people over 65 and post-menopausal women. Also with ageing demographics, the prevalence of spinal fractures is rising.

The injection of cement into the vertebra enhances the anchoring strength of Cypress screws, thereby reducing the risk of postoperative instability and repeat surgery.

Dr Jörg Franke, orthopedic surgeon at the Magdebourg Hospital in Germany and member of the Safe Orthopaedics scientific committee, said: “The solution proposed by Safe Orthopaedics improves considerably the options in Cypress screw fixation, by increasing its anchoring strength irrespective of bone quality, with the added possibility of injecting cement into the vertebra during the procedure.”

Furthermore, with its preassembled instruments, the Safe Orthopaedics solution eliminates the risk of cement leakage as the injection is performed directly into the vertebra through a single-use screwdriver, which would be impossible to do with a reusable screwdriver. The injection of cement directly into a cannula inside the screwdriver’s handle also makes the procedure easier and thus reduces operating time.

Pierre Dumouchel, Chief Executive Officer of Safe Orthopaedics, said: “With these additions to our range, which meet our availability and modularity requirements, we are now able to offer more options to surgeons to treat bone injuries associated with osteoporosis and metastases. Our Oak screw, dedicated to the treatment of spinal fractures, will also be available in a cemetable version this year, to offer simultaneous correction and fixation of osteoporotic vertebral fractures using a percutaneous approach.”

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Full-year 2016 results on April 28, 2017 (after market close)

About Safe Orthopaedics

Founded in 2010, Safe Orthopaedics is a French medical technology company that aims to make spinal surgeries safer by using sterile implants and associated single-use instruments. Through this approach, these products eliminate all risk of contamination, reduce infection risks and facilitate a minimally-invasive approach for trauma and degenerative pathologies—benefiting patients. Protected by 17 patent families, the SteriSpineTM kits are CE-marked and FDA approved. The company is based at Eragny-sur-Oise (Val d’Oise department), and has 30 employees.

For more information, visit: www.SafeOrtho.com

View source version on businesswire.com: http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20170215005723/en/

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